Difference Between Will and Can

Edited by Diffzy | Updated on: September 07, 2022

       

Difference Between Will and Can Difference Between Will and Can

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Introduction

Grammar has long been investigated as a companion to rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome, and as one of the seven liberal arts in medieval education. Although the methods for studying grammar have evolved significantly in recent years, the motivations for studying grammar have remained mostly unchanged.

One of the most reasoned responses to the query of why grammar matters can be found in a position statement on the teaching of grammar in American schools. The study, issued by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), is void of educational terminology.

This is how it starts:

"Grammar is significant because it is the language that allows us to speak about language. Grammar describes the various types of words and word groups that makeup sentences in any language. Even as children, we can put sentences together—grammar is something we can all do.

Knowing grammar, on the other hand, is being able to discuss how sentences are put together, as well as the many types of words and word groups that go into them. Knowing a language also gives you a glimpse into the human mind and our immensely complex mental capacities."

"The word grammar conjures up images of faults and perfection. Knowing about grammar, on the other hand, aids us in comprehending what makes sentences and paragraphs clear, fascinating, and exact. When we and our students carefully read the sentences in poetry and fiction, grammar can become a topic of debate. Knowing grammar also entails discovering that all languages and dialects follow grammatical patterns. 

"Will and Can are two auxiliary verbs that are frequently misunderstood in their application. They are, strictly speaking, dissimilar in terms of usage and application. The auxiliary verb 'will' is mostly employed in the present tense. The verb 'can,' on the other hand, is employed in the sense of 'capacity.'

In other words, the verb 'can' denotes 'ability,' but unlike 'will,' it does not denote future tense. The fundamental distinction between the two words is this. Take a look at the sentences below.

  1. Ria will come tomorrow to my house.
  2. Lucky will marry Priya.

The verb 'will' is used in the future tense in both statements. It's worth noting that, in addition to expressing something in the future, the verb 'will' also means 'certainty.' As a result, the second sentence's meaning would be 'Ria is certain to come to my house tomorrow,' while the second sentence's meaning would be 'Lucky is certain to marry Priya,' or 'Lucy is certain to marry Priya.'

Consider the following two sentences:

  1. Francis is capable of completing the task successfully.
  2. Angela is an excellent cook.

Will and Can are two such auxiliary verbs that are frequently used incorrectly due to their similarity in sound, but understanding the difference between these two auxiliary verbs is critical.

Because the word 'can' is used in both sentences to signify 'ability,' the first sentence's meaning would be 'Francis can complete the task successfully,' and the second sentence's meaning would be 'Angela can cook very well.'

It's worth noting that the verb 'will' is the past tense of the verb 'to be.' The verb 'can,' on the other hand, is in the present tense. 'Could' is the past tense form. The distinctions between the two verbs, will and can, are as follows.

Will and Can are two auxiliary verbs that are frequently interchanged because they sound similar. Understanding the differences between these two auxiliary verbs is important.

Will vs. Can

The key distinction between Will and Can is that while 'Will' predicts the future and denotes future events, 'Can' is more commonly employed to discuss the present as well as the future.

'Will' is a verb or, in some cases, a noun, whereas 'Can' is an auxiliary verb. When placing an order, 'Will' is also used, and 'Can' is used when requesting permission or being nice. The auxiliary verb 'will' denotes what is going to take place in the future.

Forecasts, discussions, pledges, offers, demands, and challenges are all done with the help of will. Both the auxiliary verb "will" and its negative version "won't" are modal auxiliary verbs. The word 'can' refers to something feasible.

It can also be used as a broad statement to illustrate one's ability to do something in the future or now. It can also be used to request permission. 'Cannot' or 'can't' is the negative version of the word 'can.'

The distinction between Will and Can is that whereas 'Will' predicts the future and denotes future events, 'Can' is more commonly employed to discuss the present as well as the future. 'Can' is an auxiliary verb, whereas 'Will' is a verb or, in some cases, a noun.

Difference Between Will and Can in Tabular Form

Table: Will vs. Can
Parameters of comparison
Will
Can
Usage
When a person discusses the future, they utilize the word will.
When talking about the present or the future, the word can is utilised.
Example
I will work on Monday.
I can help you with your projects.
Negative forms 
Will not or won’t 
Cannot or can’t 
Indication  
Indicates future tense 
Indicates ability  
Parts of speech 
Noun or verb 
Helping verb

What is Will? 

Will is a concept in English grammar that denotes the potential of something happening.

Consider the following scenario: 

  • As soon as you clear the storage, the computer will start working.
  • If you put forth a little more effort, the cupboard will open.
  • The exam will be tough weather will be bad for a few days so prepare yourselves.

It is also used to express wishes and intentions. For example:

  • I will start working with my mother soon
  • You will need to push yourself harder the next time
  • The teacher will be taking an oral exam next Tuesday

Will is used to making requests and to show one’s politeness. For example:

  • Will you please do this for me?
  • Will you be able to help me out?
  • Will you go ahead with your presentation?
  • Will you help me cross the road?
  • Will you give me her address?
  • Will you give that to Tony when you see him, please?

It is used to show determination or obligation. For example:

  • You will be doing this before Saturday.
  • Ramesh will come to my office no matter what.
  • Riya will have to complete her work before her boss fires her.
  • You will work here from today onwards

Will also show commitment. For example:

  • It will be done in no time.
  • The repairing work will not take much time, I promise.
  • I will get good grades in the upcoming examination.
  • I will get back to exercising as soon as I recover.

Form of affirmation

In a declaration, the word will appear first in the verb phrase (after the subject and before another verb). In informal circumstances, it is frequently contracted to

  • The next Olympic Games will be held in London.
  • I'll give you a call at about 6 p.m.

The negative form

The word won't is a negative version of the word will. With a will, we don't use don't, doesn't, or didn't:

  • They're not going to tell us much until January.

What is Can?

When we talk about possibility, we use the words can, could, and may, although their meanings are different. … Permission. To beg for permission, we use the words can, could, and may. To offer permission, we use the words can and may, but not could.

What are the two meanings of the can?

may —used interchangeably with have authority to If you'd like, you can leave right now. This is a transitive verb.

  1. archaic: the ability to do, make, or achieve something.
  2. obsolete: to be aware of; to be aware of; to be aware of; to be the aware verb that is intransitive.

Can is a word that is used to express general claims that are true. Consider the following scenario:

  • Aron can cook for the entire family.
  • You can make really good paintings.
  • My mother can teach French.
  • I can make good pasta.

It is also used to show one’s abilities. For example:

  • Birds can fly very high.
  • I can speak Urdu, English, and French.
  • Elephants can remember faces for a long time.
  • Animals can see better at night than humans.

Can is used to make offers to people. For example:

  • Can I help you with your work?
  • I can hold the shopping bags for you.
  • You can use my umbrella if you need it.
  • Can I tell you the answer?

It is also used to ask for permission. For example:

  • Can I please go to the washroom?
  • Can you help me shift the table?
  • Can you please drive me to the hospital?
  • Can you keep silent?

Can is a universal modal verb that applies to all subjects. When employing an in the third person, no additional "s" is added, as it is with other verbs. "Cannot" or "can't" is the negative version.

Here are some examples of the negative version of can, i.e., cannot:

  • I cannot make arrangements for the party tomorrow.
  • I can’t tell you the secret Reshma trusted me with.
  • I cannot attend the event held by my society.
  • I cannot bear the pain.

We use can and can't to talk about someone's skill or general abilities: She can speak several languages. He can swim like a fish. ... She could speak several languages.

" Can " is one of the most commonly used modal verbs in English. It can be used to express ability or opportunity, to request or offer permission, and to show possibility or impossibility. Examples: I can ride a horse.

There is no future tense of can or any of the other invariant models. Sometimes could is said to be conditional on the can, and would of will, though.

Difference Between Will and Can in Points

  • Will is utilized when discussing the future. Can, on the other hand, is not in the same boat.
  • Will can be used as a noun or a verb.
  • Can is a useful verb.
  • Will not or Won't is the negative form of Will, while Cannot or Can't is the negative form of Can.
  • Will always refers to the future, whereas Can refers to talents.
  • Will demonstrates dedication, whereas Can demonstrates abilities.

Conclusion

The auxiliary verb 'will' is mostly used in the future tense. The verb 'can', on the other hand, is used in the sense of 'ability.' In other words, the verb "can" denotes "ability," but it does not denote "future tense" as "will" does. This is the primary distinction between the two phrases.

Because the same modal verb can be used to denote a variety of functions, and because multiple modal verbs can mean the same thing, a non-native English speaker may use the incorrect modal verb or over use of this very same modal verb when an alternate solution verb would have been more appropriate. Understanding the distinction and implementation of 'Will' and 'Can' is essential for a non-English speaker.

In English, there are only a few different types of verbs. Write, writes, wrote, written, and writing are all synonyms for the common English verb write. However, these forms do not always express all of the meanings. Simple verb forms, for example, cannot convey concepts like questioning, time, wish, willingness, or obligation. Auxiliary verbs come in handy here, and they're used to convey these ideas.

Auxiliary verbs, also known as trying to support verbs or assisting verbs, add functionality or linguistic implications to phrases. They carry out their duties in a variety of ways. Modal auxiliary verbs include the words can and will.

You'll be better equipped to make more educated decisions and choices about grammar and usage, and to separate linguistic fact from linguistic fiction if you know how language works and have a succinct vocabulary to talk about it."

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"Difference Between Will and Can." Diffzy.com, 2022. Sun. 02 Oct. 2022. <https://www.diffzy.com/article/difference-between-will-and-can-979>.



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