Difference Between Pandemic and Epidemic

Edited by Diffzy | Updated on: August 23, 2022

       

Difference Between Pandemic and Epidemic Difference Between Pandemic and Epidemic

Why read @ Diffzy

Our articles are well-researched

We make unbiased comparisons

Our content is free to access

We are a one-stop platform for finding differences and comparisons

We compare similar terms in both tabular forms as well as in points


Introduction

The earth is a planet that is home to both live things and non-living things. In addition, numerous long-lived biotic and abiotic elements may be found there. These living and non-living species' presence has repercussions from the actions of these living and nonliving organisms. Various environmental changes are among these effects.

The regular pattern and the corresponding harmony are disturbed. Among these effects are global warming, the unbalanced nature that causes natural disasters, the spread of numerous diseases, accidents caused by humans, etc. However, disease outbreaks result in either an epidemic or a pandemic.

The public was inundated with new terminology to comprehend the virus and the following worldwide public health response when COVID-19 first emerged in 2020. An epidemic is the rapid or instant spread of a disease that is contained to a specific neighborhood, area, or nation. A pandemic, which involves and includes the spread of the illness across international borders, is a more localized variation of an epidemic. According to experts, an epidemic is the rapid spread of a disease within a small area or population. Therefore, people may view the epidemic as a pandemic or pandemic danger once it crosses international borders.

An epidemic is a quick spread of a disease or virus that occurs in a given location at a particular time. The start of an epidemic can be attributed to several factors and developments. These epidemics come in a variety of forms. Human lives are interrupted no matter what type they are. There have been various epidemics throughout global history. Although public health definitions change and develop throughout time, there are usually scale-related differences between these concepts.

Pandemic Vs. Epidemic

The meaning or definition of pandemic and epidemic is the primary distinction between the two terms. An epidemic is a quick spread of a disease or virus that occurs in a given location at a particular time. On the other hand, the sudden worldwide spread of a disease or a virus is referred to as a pandemic. A pandemic is characterized by a sudden, widespread virus breakout or illness. There have been multiple pandemics of various illnesses throughout human history. Depending on how severe they are, various pandemics have different effects. The numerous human activities that occur worldwide contribute to these pandemics, ultimately damaging human lives.

The WHO distinguishes between pandemics, epidemics, and endemic illnesses based on a disease's transmission pace. As a result, the distinction between an epidemic and a pandemic has less to do with the severity of the disease and more with how widely it has spread. In contrast to localized diseases, a pandemic transcends national borders. Pandemics cause widespread social unrest, economic loss, and overall misery because of their extensive geographic reach. It's crucial to remember that an epidemic that has already been proclaimed might turn into a pandemic. A pandemic is global and out of control, whereas an epidemic is widespread but often confined or predicted in its spread.

Difference Between Pandemic and Epidemic in Tabular Form

Table: Pandemic Vs. Epidemic
Parameters Of Comparison
Pandemic
Epidemic
Significance
A pandemic is characterized by a sudden, widespread virus breakout or illness.
An epidemic is a quick spread of a disease or virus that occurs in a given location at a particular time.
Description
A pandemic is an outbreak spread over national boundaries to several nations and continents.
An illness that spreads rapidly and has a significant negative impact on a comprehensive portion of a community, population, or area is called an epidemic.
Control
The pandemic is global and out of control,
An epidemic is widespread but often confined or predicted
Reach
Unrestricted spread It may have an impact on a particular nation or possibly the entire planet.
Confined spread A specific region or portion of the planet is impacted.
Demise Rate
More
Less
Geographic Distribution
Nations, continents, or even the whole planet.
A territory, a people, or a community
Situations
Malaria, polio, chicken pox, yellow fever, smallpox, and other diseases.
Malaria, polio, chicken pox, yellow fever, smallpox, and other diseases.

What Is Pandemic?

The World Health Organization (WHO) proclaims a pandemic when a disease spreads exponentially. This indicates that the growth rate is explosive, and new instances are reported daily. The virus's designation as a pandemic has nothing to do with its virology, population immunity, or the severity of the illness. A virus has spread far, impacting several nations and populations. There have been several pandemics over the years. The Black Death or Plague epidemic, however, is the worst pandemic that has ever struck the planet. In the syllabus of world history, there have also been other pandemics.

Recent pandemics have included

  • 1918 to 1920: H1N1 virus
  • 1957 – 1958: H2N2 virus
  • 1968–1969: H3N2 virus
  • 2009–2010: A New Flu Season A H1N1, sometimes known as the "swine flu" virus
  • 2020: The virus that causes SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)-CoV-2
  • COVID-19 (coronavirus disease)
  • The Black Death (1346–1350) and the sixth cholera pandemic are two more historical pandemics (1899–1923).

Prevalent Pandemics In The Past

  1. Other diseases have had a global impact in addition to the present COVID-19 outbreak. However, there are only a few instances of previous pandemics that influenced epidemics and human immunity:
  2. The Black Death (1346–1333): During the 14th century, the Black Death is said to have killed 25 million people worldwide. Scientists believe that the Yersinia pestis bacterium was to blame for the epidemic. It took around four years for the bubonic plague to spread.
  3. New transportation channels made feasible by the Industrial Age made it simpler for influenza viruses to spread widely and infected in the United States and abroad during the Flu Pandemic (1889–1890). The first instances of influenza were noted in Russia, and the illness spread around the globe in a few months. Despite the lack of air travel, the virus quickly spread throughout St. Petersburgbefore catching on throughout the world in general and Europe.
  4. Spanish Flu (1918–1920): The influenza pandemic, sometimes known as the Spanish Flu, was a significant illness epidemic. After World War I, in 1918, this viral epidemic started. Even though the epidemic persisted for two years, almost 50 million fatalities were reported during this outbreak.
  5. The Asian Flu pandemic, which was a concoction of bird flu viruses, started in China and ultimately resulted in the deaths of over 1 million people (1957–1958). According to the CDC, cases of the quickly increasing illness were first discovered in Singapore in February 1957, Hong Kong in April 1957, and coastal U.S. cities in the summer of 1957. Over 1.1 million people died globally, while 116,000 people died in the United States.
  6. Since its discovery in 1981, the AIDS pandemic and epidemic have claimed an estimated 35 million lives. According to scientists, a virus discovered in chimpanzees and spread to people in West Africa in the 1920s is likely the source of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. By the 20th century's end, the virus had spread over the whole planet.

The six-phase pandemic program of the WHO

The WHO laid up a six-phase approach to spot potential influenza pandemics. These stages include:

Phase 1: Health officials have made no reports of a virus spreading from animals to people.

Phase 2: According to a health authority, people have become infected with an animal influenza virus that is spreading among animals. The WHO views this as a possible threat of a pandemic when it happens.

Phase 3: A human-animal or animal-human influenza virus has spread to a few persons in a small area. However, the virus has not yet resulted in enough fast human-to-human transmission to support epidemics at the community level.

Phase 4: The ability of an animal or human-animal influenza virus to propagate swiftly enough to support an outbreak at the community level.

Phase 5: The virus generates an ongoing community-level epidemic in two or more separate countries in a single WHO area.

Phase 6: The same virus has propagated and resulted in a community-level epidemic in at least one different nation in a different WHO area, in addition to the criteria in Phase 5.

Post-pandemic and post-peak periods

The WHO also describes a "post-peak period," during which the virus's prevalence in most nations with sufficient surveillance declines to below peak levels. The WHO claims that the pandemic has finally entered a "post-pandemic era," during which the virus has subsided chiefly to seasonal influenza levels in most nations with effective surveillance.

What Is Epidemic?

An epidemic is a quick spread of a disease or virus that occurs in a given location at a particular time. The Greek terms "epi" and "demos," which mean "above" and "people," are the source of the English word "epidemic." Because an epidemic affects a smaller population, the death rate is lower. A (CDC) is an unexpected increase in diseases in a particular area. Examples of epidemics include smallpox, measles, polio, yellow fever, and smallpox. An epidemic illness doesn't need to be communicable. Other epidemics include West Nile fever and the sharp rise in obesity rates. When rates of a disease or any specific health-related activity (like smoking) are significantly higher than typically seen in a community or region, it is said to be in an epidemic state. Although there are various ways to represent the amount of illness incidence, two quantitative characteristics are most important:

  • The way a disease spreads and how quickly it does so (known as the reproduction rate)
  • The magnitude of the population at risk (known as the critical community size)

Occurrence For Epidemic

An epidemic may happen when one of the following circumstances occurs:

  • An infectious agent (bacterial infection or virus) is more prevalent where it previously occurred.
  • A location where the infectious agent was previously absent is now affected.
  • People who were not previously in danger of infection start getting sick.
  • When the infectious agent has an increased mechanism of transmission, which exposes a more significant number of susceptible individuals.

Categories Of Epidemic

Epidemics are divided into four groups. As follows:

  1. Epidemics with a common source are those in which a population or group is exposed to the same toxin or infectious agent.
  2. A propagated epidemic is when the infectious agent spreads across a population through human-to-human transmission.
  3. When a disease spreads to a community by an infectious agent before a secondary transmission from person to person occurs, the epidemic is referred to as a mixed epidemic. This is a mixture of common-source and propagated epidemics.
  4. Other epidemics are not spread by transmission or from one person to another.

Role Of Epidemiology

Determine the illness prevalence (how many persons in a population have the disease) and incidence using epidemiology (the number of new cases within a specific timeframe). These numbers can guide the correct public health response.

Main Differences Between Pandemic and Epidemic in Points

  • A pandemic is characterized by a sudden, widespread virus breakout or illness. On the other hand, an epidemic is a rapid, localized breakout of a disease or virus that occurs at a particular time and location.
  • When compared to epidemics, pandemics have a greater mortality rate.
  • The epidemic affects countries, continents, and even the entire planet. But, on either side, the pandemic only impacts a particular area and a given quantity of people.
  • More management and tactics are needed for the epidemic. But, on the other hand, the pandemic calls for substantially less administration and application of the methods.
  • Examples of epidemics include malaria, polio, yellow fever, and others. Examples of pandemics include the coronavirus pandemic, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and others.
  • An illness that spreads rapidly and significantly negatively impacts a comprehensive portion of a community, population, or area is called an epidemic. In contrast, a pandemic is an outbreak spread over national boundaries to several nations and continents.
  • Pandemics cause widespread social unrest, economic loss, and overall misery because of their extensive geographic reach. Therefore, it's crucial to remember that an epidemic that has already been proclaimed might turn into a pandemic.
  • A pandemic is global and out of control, whereas an epidemic is widespread but often confined or predicted in its spread.

Conclusion

Both pandemics and epidemics cause a great deal of material, psychological, emotional, and bodily loss. Several lives are impacted, and numerous people pass away. Although these epidemics cannot be prevented, they can be controlled with the proper safeguards and actions. A pandemic or epidemic can develop when a disease spreads rapidly. An epidemic is the unrestricted spread of a disease over a population or geographical area. An epidemic occurs when more cases of a disease than would typically be anticipated in a given population. Similar to an epidemic, a pandemic entails spreading illness over international borders. A pandemic frequently affects several countries and spreads across a wide area. Pandemics may have severe effects on the economy, society, and politics.

References


Category


Cite this article

Use the citation below to add this article to your bibliography:


Styles:

×

MLA Style Citation


"Difference Between Pandemic and Epidemic." Diffzy.com, 2022. Fri. 09 Dec. 2022. <https://www.diffzy.com/article/difference-between-pandemic-and-epidemic-940>.



Edited by
Diffzy


Share this article