Difference Between Triglycerides and Cholesterol

Edited by Diffzy | Updated on: August 09, 2022

       

Difference Between Triglycerides and Cholesterol Difference Between Triglycerides and Cholesterol

Why read @ Diffzy

Our articles are well-researched

We make unbiased comparisons

Our content is free to access

We are a one-stop platform for finding differences and comparisons

We compare similar terms in both tabular forms as well as in points


Introduction

Since water is a polar molecule, these organic compounds are nonpolar molecules that can only dissolve in nonpolar solvents. These molecules can be produced in the liver of the human body and are present in meals including oil, butter, whole milk, cheese, fried dishes, and some types of red meat. Hormones, fats, oils, and waxes are examples of the class of molecules known as lipids found in the human body. Although they are vital to your health, they can also exacerbate the disease. Hormones, fats, oils, and waxes are examples of the class of molecules known as lipids found in the human body. Although they are vital to your health, they can also exacerbate the disease.

A lipid is a large biomolecule that is soluble in nonpolar solvents in biology and biochemistry. Other naturally occurring hydrocarbon lipid substances that do not break down into fatty acids, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (including vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids (or do not dissolve in water quickly). The body uses lipids for a variety of purposes, including energy storage, signal transmission, and building cell membranes. In many applications, hydrocarbons are used as non-polar solvents. Lipids are utilized in nanotechnology in addition to the food and cosmetics industries. Depending on their amphiphilic nature, some lipids can form structures like vesicles, multilamellar/unilamellar liposomes, or membranes in an aqueous environment. Lipids are sometimes classified as hydrophobic or amphiphilic small molecules. Ketoacyl and isoprene groups, two different kinds of biochemical "building blocks," are the source of all or a portion of biological lipids. Fatty acids, glycolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, actinolepids, polyketides (formed from the condensation of ketoacyl subunits), sterol lipids, and prenol lipids are the eight types that can be created with this method (derived from the condensation of isoprene subunits).

Although fats are a subtype of lipids known as triglycerides, the word "lipid" is occasionally used as a synonym for fats. Lipids also include sterol-containing metabolites like cholesterol and other compounds like fatty acids and their derivatives (such as tri-, di-, and monoglycerides and phospholipids). Although lipids are broken down and synthesized through a variety of biosynthetic routes in mammals, including humans, some important lipids cannot be produced in this way and must be received through diet.

The term "lipids" refers to a combination of biology and chemistry. A particular class of chemical molecule called lipids is present in practically all living things. Lipids have an oily or waxy texture. Lipid molecules make up the major fats. Algae, nuts, pork, cheese, butter, and fish are just a few examples of the many foods that contain these lipids. Lipids are water-insoluble substances that are created when fatty acids and glycerol interact. These fats fall into two categories: saturated and unsaturated. They are composed of several long chains of hydrogen and carbon molecules. There are two categories: simple and sophisticated. Simple lipids are organic substances that are non-polar and soluble, such as chloroform and benzene. Complex lipids are fatty acids containing alcohol, such as those found in blood platelets, neural tissues, and cell membranes. They are substances that the human body naturally produces, such as fats, waxes, steroids, fat-soluble vitamins, glycerides, phospholipids, and others. Lipids are primarily employed for energy storage, signalling, and stimulating the membrane-bound parts of cells.

Functions of Lipid

  • Lipid, which is greasy or oily nonpolar molecules, is stored in the body's adipose tissue.
  • The majority of the diverse class of substances referred to as lipids are composed of hydrocarbon chains.
  • Lipids are energetic chemical compounds that supply a variety of biological processes with energy.
  • A class of substances known as lipids are special in that they are soluble in nonpolar solvents yet insoluble in water.
  • Lipids are essential elements of biological systems because they construct the cell membrane, a mechanical barrier that isolates a cell from its surroundings.

Health and Nutrition

The majority of the fat in meals is present as phospholipids, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Some dietary fat is required to aid in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and carotenoids. Because they cannot be produced from simple dietary precursors, humans and other mammals must consume certain important fatty acids, such as linoleic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid) and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid). Numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid ingestion on various mental conditions, cancer, and new-borns development (such as depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and dementia). Contrarily, it is now widely accepted that eating trans fats, including those found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. When lipids are overcooked due to incorrect cooking techniques, healthy fats can convert into trans fats.

The two forms of fats found in the human body are referred to as triglycerides and cholesterol, respectively. Each fat has different importance. Cholesterol and triglycerides are both significant health promoters that are present in the proper quantity in the human body. The two fats differ significantly from one another. Numerous health-related diseases can be prevented by maintaining healthy levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Triglycerides and cholesterol also serve a purpose even though they are classified as fats.

Triglycerides vs. Cholesterol

The primary distinction between triglycerides and cholesterol is that they serve quite diverse purposes when compared to one another. Triglycerides are a form of fat that metabolizes dietary fat into energy. It circulates in a person's blood. On the other hand, the liver produces cholesterol, which is a type of fat. It aids in several processes, including the production of hormones, aids food digestion, and makes vitamin D in the body.

Blood fats include triglycerides and cholesterol. The total amount of fat consumed affects blood cholesterol levels. The total fat is made up of both trans and saturated fat. Consuming large amounts of calories causes an increase in blood triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are created from the extra calories. The fat cells are where these triglycerides are kept. Alcohol, sugary foods, and extra fat, however, may cause triglyceride levels in the blood to increase. Triglycerides and cholesterol both raise the risk of cardiovascular illnesses. Triglycerides are an energy source, but cholesterol is a component of cells and several hormones. This is the main distinction between the two substances.

Difference Between Triglycerides and Cholesterol in Tabular Form

Table: Triglycerides vs. Cholesterol
Parameters of Comparison
    Triglycerides
      Cholesterol
Definition With the aid of the food they eat, triglycerides—a fatty, waxy substance—produce energy for the body and then circulate through the blood to supply that energy. A fatty waxy substance called cholesterol is released by the liver and aids in several other crucial bodily processes.
Main Function The primary purpose of triglycerides is to provide energy to the body. The primary roles of cholesterol are in the manufacturing of hormones, the process of digestion, and the synthesis of vitamin D.
Structure Three fatty acid chains are joined to form the ultimate structure of a triglyceride, which is known as a glycerol molecule. The structure of cholesterol is similar to that of a steroid, which is composed of four fused hydrogen rings.
Variations in the Ranges
Triglycerides are typical and range in intensity from high to low. borderline: 151-199 mg/dL lower than 150 mg/dL above 200mg/d;
high: greater than 500 mg/dL.
The ranges of cholesterol, from very high to very low, are as follows:
Normal range: 199mg/dL or less Probable range: 200–239mg/dL
extreme: 240 mg/dL.
Energy Source In the human body, triglycerides serve as a source of energy. In the human body, cholesterol does not serve as a source of energy.

What is Triglycerides?

Triglyceride is a type of ester that is created when three fatty acid molecules join with a glycerol molecule in fats and oils. They make up the majority of the body's fat. The end product of the breakdown of lipids during digestion is a substance called a triglyceride. The body turns the excess fat, protein, and glucose into triglycerides. These triglycerides are then carried through the bloodstream while being bound to lipoprotein globules. Triglycerides are finally absorbed by fat cells. Triglycerides like these can be used as fuel in the future. The word for the body's fats is triglycerides. It is made possible by the food we eat, which is later transformed into internal bodily energy. The sort of fat that provides energy is known as triglycerides. Two categories serve as the main divisions of triglycerides. Although regularly consuming too many triglycerides might be harmful to your health, they do provide energy. To be considered normal, triglyceride levels must be lower than 150 mg/dL.

Triglycerides are the fatty compounds that circulate in the blood and give us energy from the food we eat. Triglycerides' sole characteristic or goal is to give energy. As energy gives the body strength, a human body without it is powerless to compete with anything. Three fatty acid chains are joined to form the ultimate structure of a triglyceride, which is known as a glycerol molecule. Triglycerides can also be found in some foods including butter, oils, and different types of margarine. Alcohol and sugary foods that are consumed in excess by a person are initially converted to triglycerides before being later deposited in fat cells.

Triglycerides are described by the chemical formula C6H8O6. Other influencing factors for triglycerides include food, inactivity, diabetes, age, pregnancy, etc. Saturated and unsaturated triglycerides are the two categories into which it is separated. For later use, saturated triglycerides store energy. Unsaturated triglycerides, on the other hand, work to raise cholesterol levels and regulate heartbeats, among other things.

Triglyceride levels that rise can cause several hazardous health issues, including thyroid illness, pancreatic inflammation, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and stroke. As a result, one should have their triglycerides tested annually or every other year. Triglyceride levels should be 199 mg/dL or less to be considered normal.

What is Cholesterol?

The cell membranes and certain of the precursors to particular steroid hormones make up the sterol type molecule known as cholesterol. It has a waxy texture. In addition to being naturally present in the diet, some cholesterol is also created in the liver. Bile, which aids in digestion, and vitamin D are both produced using cholesterol. The ingestion of additional saturated and trans fats can increase blood cholesterol levels. A high blood cholesterol level has been linked to cardiovascular disease.

The body of a human contains cholesterol, another type of fat. The liver exhales cholesterol. The body needs cholesterol for several essential processes to take place. It produces hormones, aids in food digestion, and also produces vitamin D. Furthermore, there are two different categories of cholesterol. Cholesterol levels can sometimes lead to heart-related problems when they rise above the healthy range of 199 mg/dL or lower. The liver releases a waxy fatty substance called cholesterol. It supports several bodily functions. It improves the nervous system, aids in hormone production, aids in vitamin D generation, and aids in digestion. Cholesterol in the human body must be maintained because it is involved in daily actions. Cholesterol's molecular structure is C27H46O. Cholesterol is also found in many food products, and humans regularly ingest it.

The structure of cholesterol is similar to that of a steroid, which is composed of four fused hydrogen rings. There are two subtypes of cholesterol. They are Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL), also referred to as bad cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL), also referred to as good cholesterol. The cholesterol needed to carry out numerous health-related tasks and get rid of waste is known as "good cholesterol." Bad cholesterol, on the other hand, is the type of cholesterol that grows blood vessel walls and then obstructs them, making it impossible to process routine tasks.

Heart attacks and other heart-related issues can result from elevated cholesterol levels, among other health problems. One must adhere strictly to certain guidelines to lower their cholesterol levels, including maintaining a healthy diet, engaging in physical activity, taking prescribed medicine, and regularly monitoring their cholesterol levels.

Difference between Triglycerides and Cholesterol In Points

  • With the aid of the food they eat, triglycerides—a fatty, waxy substance—produce energy for the body and then circulate through the blood to supply that energy. Conversely, cholesterol is a fatty, waxy molecule that the liver releases and aids in several other crucial bodily processes.
  • The primary purpose of triglycerides is to provide energy to the body. However, cholesterol's primary roles include assisting with digestion, producing hormones, and aiding in the synthesis of vitamin D.
  • Three fatty acid chains are joined to form the ultimate structure of a triglyceride, which is known as a glycerol molecule. However, cholesterol has a steroid-like structure, consisting of four fused hydrogen rings.
  • In the human body, triglycerides serve as a source of energy. On the other hand, the body cannot use cholesterol as a source of energy.
  • Triglyceride levels that rise can cause several hazardous health issues, including thyroid illness, pancreatic inflammation, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and stroke. On the other hand, if the level of cholesterol rises, it can cause several illnesses, including heart attacks and ailments related to the heart.

Conclusion

The body contains two different forms of lipids: triglycerides and cholesterol. In addition to being produced by the body, cholesterol can originate from the diet. In the body, triglycerides are made from carbs, proteins, and fat. Cells and several hormones are produced using cholesterol as a building element. Triglycerides are a form of energy. The function of each kind of molecule in the body is the primary distinction between triglycerides and cholesterol.

The two substances that are most crucial for the human body are triglycerides and cholesterol. It has certain fundamental capabilities that support daily activities. Among the procedures are items, Triglycerides assist in increasing energy, whereas cholesterol aids in several processes, such as digestion, hormone production, nervous system regulation, and the synthesis of vitamin D, among others. The body itself performs these two processes consciously, and they also regulate its level. It can result in several risky health disorders if there is either a high or low level of both triglycerides and cholesterol. Every three to four years, one should make a checklist, and if anything seems off, they should get help right away. They are versatile from one another because of the many distinguishing characteristics and differences amongst them.

References


Category


Cite this article

Use the citation below to add this article to your bibliography:


Styles:

×

MLA Style Citation


"Difference Between Triglycerides and Cholesterol." Diffzy.com, 2022. Sun. 25 Sep. 2022. <https://www.diffzy.com/article/difference-between-triglycerides-and-cholesterol-818>.



Edited by
Diffzy


Share this article