Difference Between King James Bible and New King James Bible

Edited by Diffzy | Updated on: August 27, 2022

       

Difference Between King James Bible and New King James Bible Difference Between King James Bible and New King James Bible

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Introduction

Even civil discussions can turn tense when arguing the merits of the King James Bible versus the New King James Bible. People who adhere to the King James or New King James versions of the Bible do so fervently and sincerely. We may, however, become more united in our shared religion the more thoroughly we comprehend our differences. We must keep in mind that the King James Bible addressed religious matters for the populace in the 1600s, a time when English was more accurately used. The New King James Bible frequently seems to be starting something different by our laxer English norms. Because of this, many people think that one or the other is more accurate.

The King James Bible was wholly founded on the exclusion of the Alexandrian Manuscripts, it should be noted. The Alexandrian Manuscripts are included in the New King James Bible to obtain more precise and potent information. Most devotees of the King James Bible deny the translation of the Alexandrian Manuscripts. The New King James Bible was partly written as a fresh translation of the Bible's overall text. It was also written to depict a time when personal experiences might signify various things to other individuals. This only makes it more receptive to more contemporary ideas and interpretations; it does not make it more liberal.

Individuals who adhere to the King James Version of the Bible tend to read the text more literally. Therefore, different interpretations can result from translating the New King James Bible literally. When evaluating any version, it's important to consider human mistakes, word origins, and original definitions.

King James Bible Vs. New King James Bible

The New King James Bible is an improved and contemporary translation of the King James Bible, which is the primary distinction between it and the King James version. Their publication dates vary. The New King James Bible is more than just a collection of minor changes to the original Authorized Version text while nearly sharing the same name. Comparisons between the New King James Bible and the original text show that it is a completely new translation. Here, the familiar second-person pronouns used today in place of the time-honored "thy, thou, and thine" are almost universally associated with the revered King James Version.

The King James Bible is a modernized English translation of the Christian Bible that was written in 1604 and released in 1611. Since the 1600s, English has been spoken more and more. This Bible was specifically written for the people. The King James Bible has been completely and expertly translated into the New King James Version. They think the newly released King James Bible will have the greatest elements from both worlds.

Main Difference Between King James Bible And New King James Bible in Tabular Form

Table: King James Bible Vs. New King James Bible
Parameters Of Comparisons
King James Bible
 New King James Bible
Following the script
Only the Alexandrian passages are not included in the King James Bible.
The Alexandrian texts are the only ones in the New King James Bible.
Popularity of Translation
Nearly 38% of Americans say they prefer the King James Bible.
Despite being simple to read, over 14% of Americans prefer the New King James Bible.
Comprehension
In a bygone era of English, the King James Bible was published. So reading this Bible is frequently thought to be quite difficult.
On the other hand, it is said that reading the New King James Bible is simple since it uses everyday English.
Perception
adheres to old-fashioned ideas and values.
Adheres to contemporary ideas and principles.
Originated Year
It was first released in 1611 and later altered in 1631.
It was initially published in 1979 and then amended in 1892.
Target Audience
The general people are the intended audience. Children, however, could find reading to be quite challenging. Furthermore, many members of the general public can find it challenging to understand.
This is directed at a larger audience. More individuals can grasp the content because its format is marginally easier to read.
Revisions
The first edition was released in 1611. However, in later printings, certain mistakes were made. For example, in the line "thou shalt not commit adultery," the word "not" was omitted in 1631. The Wicked Bible came to be known as a result.
Thomas Nelson Publishers published the New Testament. It was the fifth significant modification. Finally, in 1982, the whole Bible was published.
Readability
Because it contains antiquated language, many readers find this version exceedingly challenging to read. But, then, some people like this since it sounds more lyrical.
A tiny bit simpler to read even though it is extremely close.

What Is The King James Bible?

The English translation of the Bible released in 1611 under the patronage of King James I of England is known as the King James Version (KJV), also known as the Authorized Version or King James Bible. Between the mid-17th and the early 20th centuries, the translation, widely regarded as the standard English Bible, significantly impacted the English literary style. People typically find this Bible difficult to read since it uses antiquated words that have since been dropped from the English language. However, the King James Bible's high level of comfort and familiarity is one of its greatest advantages.

Background

Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603) effectively imposed a great degree of homogeneity on the Church of England. Following Mary I's brief reign (1553-58), who tried to bring back Roman Catholicism, Protestantism was once again recognized as the national religion of England. A convention of churchmen demanded that the English Bible be updated in 1604, not long after James was crowned king of England since the current translations "were faulty and not amenable to the truth of the original." The Great Bible, which Henry VIII had ordered in 1538, was somewhat well-liked, but its subsequent versions had several errors. Though highly valued by the clergy, The Bishops' Bible (1568) could not win Elizabeth's approval or widespread adoption. The Geneva Bible (1557; first printed in England in 1576) was the most well-known English translation and was produced in Geneva by English Protestants living in exile due to Mary's persecutions. Puritans were particularly fond of it, but many more conservative people were against it because the king never approved it.

Known for since the early 20th century

The King James Version fell out of favor with many major Protestant churches at the beginning of the 20th century because they saw it as outdated. They started using more contemporary translations in the middle of the century, such as the New Revised Standard Version (1982), the Revised International Version (1978), and the Revised Standard Version (1989). However, the more well-known Psalms and the Gospels continued to be favorite sources from the King James Version. Roman Catholics who spoke English utilized the Douay-Rheims (1609), an official English Bible translated from the Latin Vulgate by English Catholic exiles in France. These translators used many of the same English sources as the King James Version translators used. While the Douay-Rheims Bible was updated in the middle of the 18th century, the translator, Richard Challoner (1691-1781), a convert from Protestantism to Catholicism, largely worked from the King James Version.

Nevertheless, the King James Version was widely accepted among English Catholics from the 18th century. The Jerusalem Bible eventually overtook the King James Version and the Douay-Rheims Bible in popularity (1966). Many Christian fundamentalists and several new Christian religious organizations are still favored as the most accurate translation of the Bible. It is also often recognized as one of early modern England's greatest literary achievements. In 1982, a full New King James Version (NKJV) with updated spellings was released.

What Is the New King James Bible?

All of the Alexandrian scripts are included in the New King James Bible in an entirely new translation that provides information about the true depth of the original words. In addition, this book was specifically created to portray a time when converting chant material into personal experience may have two completely different meanings for different people.

One hundred thirty biblical experts, theologians, and clergy members came together in 1975 under the leadership of Texas-based evangelical scholar Arthur L. Farstad to create a modern English translation of the King James Version. The Psalms, the New Testament, and the New King James Version (NKJV) were all released between 1979 and 1983. The NKJV used updated spellings and substituted more current terms and phrases for some terminology from the 17th century (such as "thou" and "thee"). Although the translators and editors worked hard to preserve the literary style of the original King James Version, which was widely regarded as one of the apex of English literature, traditional sentence structure was retained. As a result, the NKJV gained favor with Bible organizations like Gideons International.

Method of translation used with the New King James Version

The New King James Version highlights places where more widely acknowledged manuscripts diverge, even though it mostly employs the same Hebrew and Greek texts as the original KJV. Like the King James Version before it, the New King James Version uses the Textus Receptus (commonly known as the "Received Text") for the New Testament. The New King James Version revisers refer to the translation principles utilized in the original King James Version as "full equivalence," as opposed to "dynamic equivalence" or "thought-for-thought" used by many other contemporary translations.

New King James Version: Positives and Negatives

The New King James Version's strength lies in how it modernizes the  King James Version's antiquated language while retaining much of its grace and elegance. The New King James Version provides a very accurate "word-for-word" translation since it renders the text extremely literally. The New King James Version has two flaws:

  1. It relies on the Textus Receptus rather than more recent manuscript collections;
  2. It adheres to the principle of "perfect equivalence," which often makes it difficult to understand the ideas underlying the literal words.

The fact that this Bible is written in common English makes it accessible to many readers. Later, in 1982, the New King James Bible underwent revision. The ideas and preaching, as well as the principles upheld and recorded in the King James Bible, are holy and updated in the New King James Bible.

Main Difference Between King James Bible And New King James Bible in Points

  1. The New King James Bible's ideas and views are typically rejected by those who teach the King James Bible because they take into account contemporary ideas and beliefs. On the other hand, many who read the New King James Bible would not read the King James Bible due to the language.
  2. The King James Bible completely omits the Alexandrian writings, but the New King James Bible includes them.
  3. The King James Bible is challenging to read, but the New King James Bible is simpler for readers to understand.
  4. While the New King James Bible is the most popular among children because it is simple for them to read, the King James Bible is also fairly popular among adults and older age groups.
  5. The King James Bible is taken literally despite linguistic variances, but the New King James is written to reflect improved readability and properly understood.
  6. Due to the usage of antiquated terminology, many readers find this translation quite challenging. But, then, some people like this since it sounds more lyrical. However, it is a tiny bit simpler to read and identical to the King James Bible.
  7. The King James Bible or Authorized Version is another name for this. The King James Bible might be confusing compared to the New King James Bible.
  8. The general public is the King James Bible's intended readership. Children, however, could find reading to be quite challenging. Furthermore, many members of the general public can find it challenging to understand. In contrast, the New King James Bible is intended for a larger audience. More individuals can grasp the content because its format is marginally easier to read. Again, this is intended for a larger audience.

Conclusion

Christians have a wide variety of translations to select from when they pray. Accepting any Bible would be advantageous since they all introduce us to the world of God. With their respective languages, these two versions each present us with a unique facet of their material. Each translation of the old texts, the Kings James Bible and the New King James Bible, adds a unique perspective on many facets of a person's life. Which of the two Bibles is correct for each individual will vary depending on their perspectives, beliefs, and worldview. The King James Bible is the best option if you wish to read a Bible and appreciate lovely English while finding comfort.


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"Difference Between King James Bible and New King James Bible." Diffzy.com, 2022. Fri. 09 Dec. 2022. <https://www.diffzy.com/article/difference-between-king-james-bible-and-new-967>.



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