Difference Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income

Edited by Diffzy | Updated on: October 05, 2022

       

Difference Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income Difference Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income

Why read @ Diffzy

Our articles are well-researched

We make unbiased comparisons

Our content is free to access

We are a one-stop platform for finding differences and comparisons

We compare similar terms in both tabular forms as well as in points


Introduction

The economy and personal finances both have significant reliance on the functioning of the financial system. Although the terms "disposable income" and "discretionary income" are sometimes used interchangeably, they reflect two separate perspectives on a customer's financial situation.

The word "disposable money" is synonymous with the phrase "take-home pay." It is the amount that is left on a check after all taxes and other deductions have been taken off. However, discretionary income is the amount of money that is left over after other financial obligations such as debt and payments have been satisfied.

Disposable Income vs Discretionary Income 

The primary distinction between disposable income and discretionary income is that disposable income refers to an individual's take-home pay, while discretionary income refers to the amount of money that can be spent on whatever the individual chooses regardless of whether it is necessary or not. In the meanwhile, discretionary income refers to the amount of money that is left over after the wage worker deducts expenses for necessities like as housing, food, power, and medical care.

When the earnings of the majority of consumers are cut, the first part of their income to be affected is their discretionary spending money.

The term "disposable income" refers, more or less, to the amount of money that is left over after taking into account deductions for things like personal income tax and payroll, which includes things like social security and medicare. The phrase "disposable income" may have a variety of meanings, depending on the circumstances. In some instances, a person's "disposable income" will be reduced even more due to pretax deductions or goods such as healthcare coverage and retirement savings.

The amount of money left over after meeting all of one's essential financial obligations is referred to as discretionary income. Rent and other expenses, such as food and transportation, have to be paid for. After one has satisfied their essential requirements, whatever income they have leftover is considered their discretionary income, and it is this money that they may choose to invest in this or that, or even save rather than spend.

Both a company's and an individual's level of disposable income and discretionary income are important economic indicators that are used to evaluate their level of financial security.

Income may be generated by individuals or organizations via the sale of products or provision of services, or by the investment of funds in assets such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs). Pensions and Social Security payments are two additional types of income that may be received. This revenue may be used toward day-to-day expenses and essentials, or it can be spent on items that are more wants than needs.

However, there are also minor distinctions between income that is considered disposable and income that is considered discretionary. These distinctions are going to be discussed, and then you're going to find out how to figure out how much discretionary money you have. If you have a student loan, understanding how much discretionary income you have can assist you in determining how much you can afford to pay back each month under an income-driven repayment plan.

Difference Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income in Tabular Form

Table: Disposable Income vs Discretionary Income 
Parameters of Comparison
Disposable Income
Discretionary Income 
Meaning
The amount of money that remains after a person has paid all of their required taxes to the federal government, their county, and their city.
The amount of money that remains in an individual's bank account after they have paid all of their taxes and met all of their living expenditures.
Formula
Personal income – current personal taxes
The net profit after deducting taxes and mandatory outlays from the gross profit.
Income percentage
The proportion of income is much larger in comparison.
The proportion of income is smaller.
Significance
to conduct an investigation of the family's savings.
to determine the state of the economy.
Example
If total earnings were $150,000 and the average tax rate was 27%, then the amount of money available for spending would be $109,500.
The cumulative earnings were $200,000 before taxes, and the tax rate was thirty per cent. After spending $110,000 on necessary expenses, the income available for discretionary spending was $30,000.

What is Disposable Income?

When income taxes are subtracted from the total gross income of an individual or family, the amount of money that is left over is referred to as the disposable income or disposable personal income (DPI).

At the macro level, one of the most important economic variables that are used to evaluate the state of the economy as a whole is disposable personal income. This variable receives a great deal of attention. The amount of discretionary cash available to a customer is one of the most influential aspects of their purchase decisions. In addition to this, it is one of the most essential factors that determine demand.

The amount of goods and services that may be obtained throughout a certain amount of time and at a variety of prices is referred to as a person's disposable income. It suggests that the amount of discretionary income available to a person may have a role in determining the total amount of money spent on goods and services by that individual.

To calculate your disposable income, you must first establish your gross revenue. A person's gross income is their whole wage; this is the amount of money they had in their hands before any deductions for taxes or other expenses were taken out. Take your yearly revenue and deduct the amount of back taxes that you owe. The leftover amount is an indication of the money you have available for discretionary spending.

The amount of money that should be deducted from an individual's wages to account for contributions to third parties or previous tax payments is determined by the federal government based on the individual's disposable income. In addition, when calculating the amount of income that is disposable, they deduct from yearly revenue the costs of health insurance premiums and contributions made to mandatory retirement funds.

One of the economic indicators that is considered while assessing the current status of the economy is disposable income. The amount of a household's or an individual's net income that remains after all taxes and deductions have been taken out and may be used for investments, savings, or spending. The amount of money left over after paying bills and other expenses after receiving a salary is referred to as "disposable income." Discretionary income is calculated by subtracting all obligatory payments from total disposable income.

A significant rise in disposable income in the United States increases the value of the stock market.

This is because stock market valuation rises when employment levels are high and consumer spending is strong. The manufacturing and service sectors both experience a rise in production and output whenever there is an uptick in demand for products and services.

The health of the stock market and the gross domestic product of the United States are directly correlated to the level of consumer spending. When a household's income becomes more disposable, they have the option of either investing and saving the money (by opening a high-interest savings account or an individual retirement account, for example) or spending it on new goods.

When consumers have less discretionary money, they often spend and invest less, which has the potential to affect the stock market. If customers are compelled to practice more frugality, this may result in a decline in sales and profits for companies and enterprises, which in turn may cause a decline in the price of stocks.

What is Discretionary Income?

The percentage of an employee's pay that remains after taxes and the provision of personal necessities like food, shelter, and clothing is referred to as the employee's discretionary income. This money may be used for consumption, investment, or accumulation.

The term "discretionary income" refers to income that may be spent on purchases such as vacations, luxury goods, and other goods and services that are not necessary. Businesses that sell items that are considered to be discretionary fare the worst during times of market turmoil and economic crisis. This is because discretionary spending money is the first to decrease when people lose their jobs or have their pay cut.

The ability of consumers to spend their money as they see fit is critical to the success of an economy. The only time consumers spend money on things like vacations, entertainment, and consumer electronics is when they have extra cash lying around. Some people make their discretionary purchases using credit cards, but it's important to remember that having credit debt isn't the only need for having a discretionary income.

Businesses stand to gain when individuals and families spend a disproportionately high amount of their discretionary income on a variety of forms of investment capital. The money might be used to develop the businesses, which would lead to an increase in both the number of employment available and the amount of revenue available for discretionary spending. The goal of the investments is to generate a return for the owner, which will, in the long run, increase the individual's discretionary income.

One of the most important indicators of the state of the economy is discretionary income. Analysts make use of it in combination with disposable income to construct significant economic proportions such as the marginal propensity to spend (MPC), a marginal propensity that would save (MPS), and consumer leverage ratios.

After paying taxes and necessary expenses like a mortgage or rent, utilities, school loans, or credit card obligations, an individual or family is said to have "discretionary income." This is the amount of money that is available for the person or household to invest, save, or spend. The term "discretionary income" refers to a subset of the more general term "disposable income," and as a result, the two categories of income have certain commonalities.

However, there is a significant distinction between the two: disposable income does not take into consideration the cost of essentials. Simply put, it is the amount of money left over after taxes that you have available to spend on things that aren't necessary.

When calculating your discretionary income, you should first start with your disposable income, which is the total amount of money that is available to you after you have paid all of your taxes. Next, you will need to make a list of all of the essentials that you now pay for, including your rent or mortgage, your food, your loans, and your auto payments. Your discretionary income is the amount of money that you have leftover after you have paid for everything on that list, and it may be used for saving, spending, or investing.

Main Differences Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income in Points

  • Discretionary income is the sum of money that is available to an individual or residence after taxes have been deducted and before any expenditures on essential items such as housing, meals, or clothing have been made. Disposable income is the sum of money that is available to an individual or residence for spending, saving, or making investments after taxes have been deducted.
  • The formula for calculating disposable income is personal income minus current personal taxes, while the formula for calculating discretionary income is gross profit minus taxes minus mandatory expenditures. The formula for calculating disposable income is personal income minus current personal taxes.
  • When required expenditures are not removed from an individual's income, the amount of money that is available for discretionary spending is higher; however, when necessary costs are taken from an individual's income, the amount of income that is available for discretionary spending is lower.
  • Researchers use the discretionary income to examine the financial reserves, assets, and spending patterns of households, while economists use disposable income to assess the state of the economy.
  • If a family's total earnings are $150,000 and the average tax rate is 27%, then the family's disposable income will be $109,500. On the other hand, if an individual makes $200,000 before taxes and is taxed at 30% of the total, then their discretionary income will be $30,000 after paying $110,000 in necessary expenses.
  • After you've paid all of your federal, state, and local taxes, your disposable income is the amount of money you have leftover. However, after paying your taxes and covering all of your essential daily needs, your discretionary income is what's leftover. The main distinction between the two is what and how much of your earnings are subject to withholding and deduction.
  • Disposable income is generated by subtracting income taxes and other basics from money, whereas total taxes are subtracted from income to produce disposable income.
  • Disposable income is the amount of money that can be invested, saved, or spent on essentials and non-necessary goods and services after income taxes have been deducted. Discretionary income is the money left over after essential needs are covered for a family or person.

Conclusion

If, after subtracting taxes, you find that you still have any money left over, you should be extremely careful about how fast you spend it. It is important to not confuse disposable income with discretionary income, since failing to recognize the difference between the two may have a significant impact on your financial plan.

Your discretionary income is the amount of money you have leftover after paying all of your taxes and meeting your essential financial obligations, which may include the cost of rent or a mortgage, premiums for health insurance, groceries, clothing, and transportation. In other words, discretionary income refers to the amount of money that is disposable after deducting the necessary costs of maintaining a family.

In most cases, discretionary money is spent on things like food and dining out, vacations, yachts, recreational vehicles (RVs), securities, and a wide variety of other things that we might "live without."

Because the cost of necessities has not yet been subtracted from the total amount of disposable money, the general rule states that a family's disposable income should always be greater than its discretionary income. This is because the total amount of disposable money does not yet include those costs.

References


Category


Cite this article

Use the citation below to add this article to your bibliography:


Styles:

×

MLA Style Citation


"Difference Between Disposable Income and Discretionary Income." Diffzy.com, 2022. Fri. 09 Dec. 2022. <https://www.diffzy.com/article/difference-between-disposable-income-and-discretionary-income-446>.



Edited by
Diffzy


Share this article